Jenna Craig | May 8, 2012

A new version of COMSOL Multiphysics will be released very soon, and in conjunction with this we are holding webinars to go over what exactly is new in COMSOL Multiphysics version 4.3. For our friends located in Europe, the free webinar will be conducted live on June 21st. The speaker of this online event, Phil Kinnane, will introduce you to three brand new products and go over the wide array of tools that are available in this new version.

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Phil Kinnane | May 7, 2012

It’s an exciting time here as we’re starting to release a series of resources for COMSOL users and people interested in modeling and optimizing multiphysics and other engineering applications. This will be done as a set of CDs that will contain animated videos summarizing the features in COMSOL’s suite of products, and videos showing model examples being built. Also included on this CD will be white papers, conference articles, and reports of real-life situations where modeling has been applied.

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Phil Kinnane | May 4, 2012

This week we ran a series of three one-day courses. The first two days centered on modeling batteries and fuel cells, as well as electrodeposition applications. Today, the course looked at simulating corrosion. This was a great opportunity for a number of our customers and other interested people to try out the new Corrosion Module.

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Jenna Craig | May 3, 2012

Looking for an overview of what’s new in COMSOL Multiphysics version 4.3? Check out our free webinar on June 7th. In this online event, David Kan will introduce three all-new products and walk you through a suite of new tools now available.

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Phil Kinnane | May 2, 2012

This Friday, a training course in modeling corrosion is being run at the COMSOL Burlington office. Participants will be introduced to the new Corrosion Module and will be led through a number of different exercises.

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Phil Kinnane | May 1, 2012

A couple of our COMSOL users that I previously blogged about in “How we Realized we were Good at Enabling Users to Model Cloaking” have been selected as one of the Journal of Optics ‘TOP 25’ articles for 2011. These were chosen based on being the most downloaded, cited, or of highest quality ranking.

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Phil Kinnane | April 30, 2012

We’re increasing the electrochemical family of products with the next version of COMSOL. Joining the Batteries & Fuel Cells and Electrodeposition Modules will be the Corrosion Module. This will allow for the modeling of all types of electrochemical corrosion (galvanic, pitting, etc.) as well as corrosion protection. This has been an exciting development and is the response to a number of COMSOL users who have requested it.

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Fanny Littmarck | April 27, 2012

COMSOL allows the researcher or designer to couple many physics phenomena at once and create multiphysics models. Being able to bring in every applicable aspect of physics into a virtual model is what makes the simulation “real” enough to accurately represent what the actual product would look and act like.

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Phil Kinnane | April 26, 2012

We’ve just got another finished article and layout back for COMSOL News and it looks as great as the others, but for different reasons. We usually ask a couple of our partners to write an article for COMSOL News to provide users with some more technical background to modeling. AltaSim Technologies, who are certified consultants and even run courses in COMSOL, have written an article about surface plasmon resonance.

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Phil Kinnane | April 25, 2012

While working on a project that involves corrosion I found this site that spends quite a bit of time explaining the phenomenon. This lab at the NASA Kennedy Space Center has done a great job in summarizing the different types of corrosion that can occur, and how they do occur. Galvanic and pitting corrosion are a couple of types I’ve heard of, but filiform corrosion is a new one.

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Phil Kinnane | April 24, 2012

I’ve just been reading my favorite news service, www.physorg.com, and noticed that cloaking is once again the topic of the day. While we have previously reported on a group out of Duke University, this article mentions a group from Ames Laboratory in Iowa. Similar to the Duke Group, Costas Soukoulis from Ames Laboratory also seems to have been at the forefront of this research.

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